reduced floor outletjpg

Building codes specify so many outlets per linear wall footage.  However, furniture including tabletops and light fixtures are rarely placed right off or against the wall. So often the results are ugly electrical cords run to/from wall outlets. The solution:Floor outlets!  But not so fast – today’s floor outlets go only half way on esthetics.

Floor outlets are nothing new.  However, try to find one where the plug from your fixture sits into the floor outlet thus hiding the bulky plug.  It should be a really simple thing.  Wrong – years of search have not yielded an outlet that is sunk into the opening between beams so that the plug can fit into it and only the cord shows.

Today’s residential floor outlets have covers that either unscrew or flip up.  In all cases, the fat pronged plug part sits on top AND to make things even worse the plug then holds up the cover.  After a few years the covers of these floor outlets are typically lost in the case of the screw-on type or broken.

Commercial floor outlets and data ports have long been flush to the floor.  The minute something is called “commercial” the price tag goes way up and often residential electricians do not know about these commercially available outlets.

Today’s high-end residential building industry concerns itself with ways of visually disappearing switches, electrical outlets, data jacks, volume controls, touch pads and speakers from walls.

Take Trufig, for example.  Their new line of wall outlets and wall switches has a beautiful streamlined look. Their installation system makes so much sense. The entire Trufig line is based on the fact that homeowners do not want to look at plugs and switches on beautifully detailed walls – correct.  But how about eliminating ugly outlets on beautiful flooring?

Putting on my builder hat for a moment I have to say the Trufig system is simple, fast and foolproof: Bravo! But even the Truffig line of outlets does not contain a flush floor outlet. Why not? Floor outlets are great under side tables and around home offices.

I almost want to turn myself into a manufacturer – this obvious industry need makes this idea a moneymaker!

 

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